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How to Arrange Summer Flowers Slideshow

How to Arrange Summer Flowers Slideshow


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1. Set Up Your Work Area

Start with a big selection of flowers. Pictured above are Roo-Roo’s hydrangeas and gardenias from her home garden which she transported two hours to the beach. She lines her table with newspaper to make a mess on and then throw out after clean up. Smart.

2. Start With Greenery

She said to make sure your vase is at waist height or above so you can step back to examine the shape as it builds. Line the first layer of your vase with greenery from your garden or florist.

3. Add the Largest Flowers First

Add the largest stalks of flowers to the center and back of your arrangements to start the shape. Be sure to remove the greenery that will be sitting in the water, too.

4. Create a Foundation

These four tall hydrangeas are the foundation of her arrangement but any large blooms will work for
this step.

5. Then Fill in With More Flowers

Fill in the front and center of the arrangement with shorter blooms and varied hues to create interest and depth. Continue to fill in with more blooms and greenery until your vase is full and your arrangement has a pretty shape.

6. Add Color and Texture

Now add in some smaller flowers in contrasting colors and shapes. She added gardenias (which Roo-Roo would have wrapped with floral wire to keep from dropping if she had some) and some pale pink flowers and shooting star hydrangeas for contrast.

7. The Finished Piece

Roo-Roo’s general advice on floral arrangements is “make it so that a bee can fly through it.” Natural
and open, her flowers look artfully placed, not fussily stuffed into tight bundles. She placed the arrangement on an entryway table to the back porch so all who passed snagged a scent of gardenias in their day, but it would work just as well on a buffet table, or if shorter in height, on your dinner table.


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).


How to forage for and arrange wildflowers

In an extract from her new book ɿield Flower Vase', which focuses on how to forage for and arrange wildflowers, Lisbon-based floral designer Chelsea Fuss explains how to pick and arrange summer wildflowers.

F illing a pitcher with freshly picked blossoms and greens is a quick and easy way to bring summer inside and brighten up even a pragmatic corner of your living room or office.

You will need

  • 5 to 7 bunches of meadow grasses
  • A mix of foraged wildflowers—whatever you find on your walk
  • A tall pitcher with a narrow neck

Tossing stems of summer wildflowers into a pitcher with minimal adjustments feels like an essential summer ritual. I’ve collected all sorts of vintage pitchers over the years to do just that. Their narrow necks provide easy structure for free-flowing arrangements without the need for any sort of tying or mechanics.

Advertisement

How to recreate the wildflower meadows of Highclere Castle

For this meadow-on-your-desk, go for a walk and gather stems of wildflowers in a lot of different varieties. Look beyond floral elements and see if you can find interesting textural combinations—different leaf patterns and scales, contrasting greens, and dried grasses will offer color contrast, even in a non-floral arrangement.

Here I used cow parsley, thistles, wild roses, willowherb, campion, grasses, and even dandelions. Notice that as the campion dried and fell from the vase, I left it. I don’t like flowers to look too perfect, as though they are fake. In nature we see wilting petals, dried bits, and less than pristine blooms, and they all create interesting textures within an arrangement. Embrace this imperfection and you can create effortless fresh flower displays.

Gather a basket of wildflowers, arranging them in your hand as you go, handling them as minimally as possible.

Aim for a mix of taller stems, such as grasses and wild roses, along with shorter ones to create space in the arrangement include a few unruly vines for movement.

Cut the stems when you bring them home and place them immediately into a pitcher with fresh water. After a few hours, or overnight, refresh the water (use the old water to water plants).



Comments:

  1. Voodoogor

    the idea Remarkable and timely

  2. Bayley

    Won't you give me the minute?

  3. Arashitaur

    You have hit the mark. Thought good, I support.

  4. Deoradhain

    I think you are making a mistake. Let's discuss.



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